BMW-Driver.net Forums banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
592 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys,

A new White Golf GTI was purchased in December by one of my clients, Dave. I had detailed his previous red Golf GTI to a very high gloss and coated it with Crystal Diamond Glaze.



CDG is one of the great sealants. It lasts well and leaves a gloss to rival the very best waxes out there. But most of all, the owner was impressed with how easy the car was to clean with CDG. So when he purchased the new White GTI, he wanted to get it into me as soon as possible for another treatment.

Now, because ease of maintenance is important, I introduced Dave to CQuartz where you not only get easy upkeep, you also get your paint made 50% harder. He went for it straight away. Especially since it lasts for years, instead of months (like CDG) - or weeks (like waxes).

Here's the car when it arrived. One of the problems with hatchbacks is that the muck gets sucked up onto the back in the normal course of driving.



The process begins with a full paint detox to get rid of everything down to even the dealer sealant that is applied in the showroom. Stage A, Acids Neutraliser - an alkaline foaming wash to get rid of contaminants with acidic characteristics.


This reveals any inorganic bonded contaminants. The car is dried and because it was raining hard, I took it into the workshop for the next stages.
First up, the car was covered in tar:



When I cleansed all that away, it revealed something a little more sinister! The rear of the car was covered in brakedust.




I normally take care of this with my full detox wash, but I wanted to show you another product available to the general public called Iron X. This is designed to cleanse paint and wheels of iron particles. As soon as it reacts it runs purple so you can see how effective it is.







While the Iron X did its stuff, I used the second part of my De-Tox process on the rest of the paint to eliminate anything of an alkaline nature.




Then back outside where I applied a little carbon-solvent onto the exhaust before rinsing and treating the car, including the glass, with a clay bar.




It was lashing out, so no photos of the following stages, but there was very little contamination left for the clay bar after the detox process. It finishes with a pH 7 wash down to leave the paint as clean as the day it was sprayed. ;)

There were some swirls and light scratches on the paint but I couldn't capture them with camera on the white paint. :rolleyes: I think the car was ex-demo so you can imagine the dealer had washed it several times... dealer-style!!

Anyway, polishing of paintwork and glass was next.







The car is then wiped down with a strong IPA / detergent solution to remove any traces of oil from the polishes before applying the first coat of CQuartz to the paint, glass and wheels.




After the first coat, you can already see a more intense gloss forming on the paint.









Dried under the Infra Red and let cure for an hour before the next coat is applied. The second coat is to reinforce the first and make the paint even harder and ensure even coverage.
























CQuartz coating was applied to wheels, glass, paint and plastic trim. Sorry to go into so much detail but I wanted to establish that it requires more effort than putting a simple wax on the paint. But the pay-off is really worth it. Its super glossy along with the other benefit.

The weather was a bit nuts for taking pics. It was either too dull or too bright for the whiteness of the paint!! :D I was happy the sun came out for the last photos though.... and for the owner collecting. It looked great. :cool:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
592 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
It does stink. The new version has been released though and has a floral sent or something. I gave a sample bottle of the original product to one of the guys here and he said it "smelled like death"... LMFAO still! Great description.

Hey, if you want to get a full sized bottle, I can post it out to you. I think it works out at €26 including postage. Voted Second Best Product of 2010 on Detailing World. It is brilliant though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,362 Posts
If you dont mind me asking how much do you charge for that job.
You can pm me if you want.
Thanks
John
 

·
2003 E39 525i
Joined
·
5,618 Posts
Now, because ease of maintenance is important, I introduced Dave to CQuartz where you not only get easy upkeep, you also get your paint made 50% harder.
Im curious about the CQuartz

Just a quick question...re: quote above

You say that it gets your paint made 50% harder....
Do you mean by that, that the paint is 50% harder or that the coating applied is 50% harder than paint?
Reason I ask is that very hard paint is usually very prone to stone chipping....BMW paint very hard anyways and my front bumper suffers a bit from road rash; wouldnt like to see it 50% worse! :eek:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
592 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Im curious about the CQuartz

Just a quick question...re: quote above

You say that it gets your paint made 50% harder....
Do you mean by that, that the paint is 50% harder or that the coating applied is 50% harder than paint?
Reason I ask is that very hard paint is usually very prone to stone chipping....BMW paint very hard anyways and my front bumper suffers a bit from road rash; wouldnt like to see it 50% worse! :eek:
Good question. Technically, CQuartz makes the paint "surface" 50% harder due to the ceramic quartz particles bonding and forming a shell - like a second clear coat. It doesn't make the whole coat of paint underneath 50% harder. So if a stone chip hits it, you won't get 50% more damage. Actually it will help reduce the damage if anything, but its not bulletproof. Chips will still happen unfortunately. Best thing for chips on the front bumpers is Ventureshield from Revolution Ireland, but its like comparing apples to oranges with CQuartz. They coatings have different ambitions.
 

·
2003 E39 525i
Joined
·
5,618 Posts
Thanks for the reply....totally understand that stone chips are not preventable, but wouldnt want to be using something that exaggerates it! ;)

Another question...sorry...should have asked first time out!
The coating that the CQuartz gives is obviously a great protection in the fight against swirl marks (along with a host of other techniques) on the paintwork...after all prevention is better than cure ;) ....but does the coating suffer in a similar way?
And is the coating hard to remove once applied? Say I apply it and then after 6 months, I decide I could have done a better job of polishing the paint work pre application - how hard is it to completely remove the coating - I assume clay wont do it! ;)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
592 Posts
Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Thanks for the reply....totally understand that stone chips are not preventable, but wouldnt want to be using something that exaggerates it! ;)

Another question...sorry...should have asked first time out!
The coating that the CQuartz gives is obviously a great protection in the fight against swirl marks (along with a host of other techniques) on the paintwork...after all prevention is better than cure ;) ....but does the coating suffer in a similar way?
And is the coating hard to remove once applied? Say I apply it and then after 6 months, I decide I could have done a better job of polishing the paint work pre application - how hard is it to completely remove the coating - I assume clay wont do it! ;)
You mean does the CQuartz suffer and not the paint? No. Its pretty good in that way. I put CQuartz on half an old bonnet in the workshop. I tested it with a key, a coin and a nylon brush. I tried to really gouge the paint with the key and the coin - it damaged the uncoated paint as expected but left only a faint mark in the CQuartz. With the brush, it caused heavy swirls and scratches in the uncoated side and only very minor marks in the CQuartz.

I also banged the coin fairly hard on both sides and it made hardly a mark on the CQuartz, where it did damage the uncoated side. I actually made a video of myself doing it, with me talking the viewer through it, but it was way too embarrassing to post up!!! LMFAO:eek::p But the bonnet is still in the workshop if anyone wants to see it. :)


Edit - forgot to say that it can only be removed by polishing it out with an abrasive polish. It won't wash off or be removed by cleaner wax, clay or anything really. I sprayed Wheel cleaner on it - neat solution - and it didn't affect it at all. It is really durable. In fact if you need to get a panel resprayed, the bodyshop would need to sand it off first with 3000grit paper.
 

·
2003 E39 525i
Joined
·
5,618 Posts
Interesting.....
Thought that it would need some work to get it removed and that there wouldnt be some easy way to remove it, like a chemical to dissolve it! ;)
Thanks for the info! :)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
592 Posts
Discussion Starter #13

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,525 Posts
Lovelt job done, :)

The paint is terrible on those new yokes though isn't it? I think its the 7th pic you can see a real orange peely texture off the paint.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
592 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Hard to get nice flat paint on any production line car these days. Pity. They spray everything so thinly and economically that wet-sanding them to perfection is very dodgy.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top